Lothal

Lothal

Situated at a distance of 80 kms from Ahmedabad, Lothal city is one of the well known cities of the ancient indus valley civilization. The origin and history of Lothal can be dated back to 2400 bc. Lothal in Gujarat is one of the primary sites of archaeology. Though, it was discovered in the year 1954, but its excavation work began on the February 13, 1955, which continued till May 19, 1960. It was done by the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI).

Lothal has enjoyed the status of being the leading center of trade in the bygone times. It was actively involved in the trade of beads, gems and expensive ornaments that were exported to West Asia and Africa. The techniques that were used by the people of this city brought a lot of name and fame to them. People are of the say that, the scientists of Lothal were the ones to initiate the study stars and advanced navigation.

Lothal is one of the most prominent cities of the ancient Indus valley civilization, located in the Bhāl region of the modern state of Gujarāt and dating from 3700 BCE. Discovered in 1954, Lothal was excavated from 13 February 1955 to 19 May 1960 by Shri S.R.Rao, Archaeologist of the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI), the official Indian government agency for the preservation of ancient monuments. Lothal’s dock—the world’s earliest known—connected the city to an ancient course of the Sabarmati river on the trade route between Harappan cities in Sindh and the peninsula of Saurashtra when the surrounding Kutch desert of today was a part of the Arabian Sea. It was a vital and thriving trade centre in ancient times, with its trade of beads, gems and valuable ornaments reaching the far corners of West Asia and Africa. The techniques and tools they pioneered for bead-making and in metallurgy have stood the test of time for over 4000 years.

Lothal is situated near the village of Saragwala in the Dholka Taluka of Ahmedabad district.  It is also connected by all-weather roads to the cities of Ahmedabad (85 km/53 mi), Bhavnagar, Rajkot and Dholka. The nearest cities are Dholka and Bagodara. Resuming excavation in 1961, archaeologists unearthed trenches sunk on the northern, eastern and western flanks of the mound, bringing to light the inlet channels and nullah (“ravine”, or “gully”) connecting the dock with the river. The findings consist of a mound, a township, a marketplace, and the dock. Adjacent to the excavated areas stands the Archaeological Museum, where some of the most prominent collections of Indus-era antiquities in India are displayed.

Lothal was surrounded by a massive brick wall, which was probably used for flood protection. The southeastern quadrant takes the form of a great platform of brick with earth filling, rising to a height of about 13 feet (4 metres). On this were built a series of further smaller platforms with intersecting air channels, reminiscent of the granary at Mohenjo-daro, with overall dimensions of about 159 by 139 feet (48 by 42 metres).

Then, a great flood apparently resulted in gradual decline of Lothal.

While there is still no sure reason for the decline of the city , archaeological evidence gathered by the Archaeological Survey of India, appears to point to natural catastrophes, mainly floods and storms as the source of Lothal’s downfall. The worst consequence was the shift in the course of the river, cutting off access to the ships and dock.

What to See and Do

Lothal, one of the most prominent cities of the ancient Indus Valley Civilization, located in the Bhal region of the modern state of Gujarat, in the western part of India is just one such example.

Lothal, which means ‘The City of Dead‘, is an old city dating back to the 4,400-year-old Harappan civilization and one of the few known ports on an ocean.

Where To Stay

No accommodation available near to Lothal. Ahmedabad is 85 km away and tourists can stay at Ahmedabad only.

How To Get Around

Lothal is well connected with Ahmedabad, Rajkot cities.

2017-10-30T13:25:52+00:00